School of Environment


Geography stage III courses

At Stage III, you should specialise in particular topic areas within Geography. With this in mind, we offer you a wide selection of advanced courses.

You will be able to choose from among courses in field techniques, remote sensing and GIS, as well as a wide variety of topics in human and physical geography and environmental management. In making your selection, remember that it is prudent to select courses that complement each other. This is especially important when you choose a Field Research course from: GEOG 315 emphasises social science field research methods; and GEOG 330 emphasises physical geography field methods. The field research course you choose should be taken alongside or complement the relevant Stage III courses in human or physical geography or environmental management.

There are prerequisites for some Stage III Geography courses.  If courses do not have a formal prerequisite, you are strongly advised to take note of the preparation advice given with each course. Previous study in Geography at Stage I or II is required or advisable in all cases, but students whose major is not in Geography may still have appropriate experience and find these courses usefully complement their other studies. If you have any concerns over your preparedness for Stage III courses please consult the course coordinator.

Geography Majors should note the following requirements:

  • Geography majors must complete a minimum number of courses in Geography at the Stage III level. However, students are advised to take more than the minimum number of courses unless they are pursuing a double major. This is particularly important if you are considering postgraduate study towards an Honours degree or a postgraduate diploma.
  • Majors must also complete at least one of the Field Research courses: GEOG 315 or GEOG 330. These courses include instruction in research methods and a field research experience, and are regarded as essential to the completion of a Geography degree. Please note the basic features of these courses, and make your selection carefully. In particular, make sure that you can attend the field course associated with the course you choose.

GEOG 302: Space, Place, Economy*


Explores the spatial organisation of economies and the economic production of space and place. The course enriches the study of economies and their geographies by drawing upon cultural, political and institutional theories to critically examine concepts and techniques traditionally deployed by geographers.  Alternative ways of understanding and influencing economic change are considered. Novel insights are developed into New Zealand’s national and local economies.

*This course is not offered in 2017.

GEOG 302: Space, Place, Economy
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GEOG 305: Population, Health and Society


A survey of major themes in population, health and social geography. An examination of the dynamics of population complements analyses of health and health care, the education sector, the welfare state, and the changing character of urban places.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week plus one 1-hour tutorial per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Preparation: No formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 202 or equivalent is assumed
Course coordinator:  
Robin Kearns

GEOG 305: Population, Health and Society
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GEOG 307: Urban Geography


Analysis of key processes shaping socio-cultural geographies of contemporary cities. Using international and local examples, issues such as the economy of cities, the culture of cities, home and housing, segregation and polarisation, the imaging of cities and sustainability are explored.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1 hour lectures per week plus one 1-hour tutorials
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Preparation: No formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 202 or equivalent is assumed
Course coordinator: 
Larry Murphy

GEOG 307: Urban Geography*
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GEOG 312: Geographies of Pacific Development


This course examines development processes and issues in the countries of the Pacific Islands. Themes will include development theory, colonialism, population, economic systems, migration, gender, ethnicity and identity, geopolitics and environment, international linkages and development strategies.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: Two 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Preparation: No formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 202 or equivalent is assumed
Course coordinator:  
Ward Friesen

GEOG 312: Geographies of Pacific Development
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GEOG 315: Research Design and Methods in Human Geography


A lecture, practical and field course, the focus of which is a residential field section during the mid-semester study break. The course provides you with experience in designing and executing a substantial research project. It is designed to prepare you for the increasing number of jobs that require these research skills as well as an introduction to research for those of you proceeding to higher degrees. The course is intended for students majoring in Geography whose interests are in human geography and environmental management. Lecture topics include research design, methodology, research ethics, information sources, field research techniques, data analysis, and research communication. This is an intensive course that includes practical sessions and small group discussions. The emphasis is on research skills and assisting you in your independent research project. It is imperative that students can attend all scheduled classes from the beginning of the semester as well as the field camp. Any concerns about this and timetable clashes should be discussed with the course coordinator.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: One 2-hour lecture and a 2-hour tutorial per week, plus two residential field trips: Thursday 3 and Friday 4 August; and during the mid-semester break - either 11-13 September or 13-15 September. Accommodation and transport will be provided, although there will be a fee to cover food costs.
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Suitability: suitable for those students majoring in geography whose programmes focus upon human geography, environmental management or data analysis
Research Methods: Social science research methods
Prerequisite: GEOG 250 and either GEOG 202 or 205 plus at least one of GEOG 302, 305, 307, 312, 320, 322-327, 352, or equivalent. 
Course coordinator: 
David Hayward

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GEOG 317: Remote Sensing and GIS


Further develops key concepts of geographic information science as it is applied to earth and environmental sciences including physical geography. Covers techniques for describing the physical environment, ways of analysing and visualising the environment, particularly raster-based surface models. Also compares theories of remote sensing from space, the air, non-imagery raster data. Skills in analysing and properly using various types of remote sensing materials are developed through labs.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisite: GEOG 210 or equivalent
Course coordinator: 
Jay Gao

GEOG 317: Remote Sensing and GIS
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GEOG 318: GIS Principles and Practice


Key concepts of geographic information science and their application in diverse fields such as retailing, environmental management, population mapping, health, crime analysis, and planning. Covers techniques for visualising and describing geographical systems, ways of analysing spatial data, and the impact of recent developments in web-mapping.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisite: GEOG 210 or equivalent
Course coordinator:
Agnieszka Leszczynski

GEOG 318: GIS Principles and Practice
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GEOG 320: Resources and Environmental Management


This course examines the development and conservation of natural resources with reference to the way in which institutional structures determine resource use and allocation. In particular, attention is given to the management of the environmental impacts of resource use and the policy framework for resource and environmental management in New Zealand. The course adopts a definition of the environment that includes the economic and social structuring of human and biophysical ecosystems. Key themes for the course include environmental justice, the conflict between expert knowledge and public participation, and the socio-cultural dimensions of sustainability in resource management.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week with a 2-hour laboratory in six of the teaching weeks
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework (essay 20%, labs 20%), 60% final examination
Preparation: no formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 205 is assumed
Course coordinator:  
Brad Coombes

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GEOG 322: Culture and Environment in East Asia


A topical and regional approach to the geography of East Asia. The unity and diversity of East Asia, environment and cultural development, industrialisation and urbanisation, population problems, and environmental management are emphasised.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures plus one 2-hour tutorial per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Preparation: no formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 202 is assumed
Course coordinator: 
Hong-Key Yoon

GEOG 322: Culture and Environment in East Asia
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GEOG 324: Critical Perspectives on Sustainable Development


A critical evaluation of the challenges of sustainable development emphasising the structural and political factors that contribute to unequal development relations. Introduces a variety of theoretical frameworks to interrogate sustainable development strategies and solutions. The course focuses on integrating research and theory into practical learning.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week, plus a 1-hour tutorial
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Course coordinator:  
Ann Bartos

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GEOG 325: The Human Dimension of Disasters


An overview of the human dimension of disasters which covers crucial concepts and theories, vulnerability and the causes of disasters, disaster risk reduction and management, post-disaster recovery and transversal issues such as culture and gender. The discussions encompass not only theoretical but also policy and practical materials and draw on examples and case studies from throughout the world with a particular focus on the most vulnerable and marginalised areas and communities.

This course is taught in: Second semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: one 2-hour and one 1-hour lecture per week, and a 1-hour tutorial, plus two field trips on Saturday 21 and Saturday 28 March
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Course coordinator: JC Gaillard

GEOG 325: The Human Dimension of Disasters
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GEOG 330: Research Methods in Physical Geography


This course gives students direct involvement with the research process, as practised in physical geography. Emphasis is given to research design, methods and techniques from the component fields of physical geography. The focus of the course is a compulsory residential field trip. On this field trip students will apply selected research methods and techniques to a research project. Lectures and laboratories before the field trip will be used to guide students through the research design process, and after the field trip to assist with data analysis, interpretation and reporting.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: Three 1-hour lectures, plus a 2-hour tutorial in week 10; plus a five day field trip during the mid-semester break (either 29 August-2 September or 5-9 September)
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework (details of the coursework will be advised at the start of the course)
Suitability: Suitable for students wishing to specialise in physical geography, environmental or data analysis
Methods: Selected physical geography field and laboratory techniques for data collection and analysis
Prerequisite: 75 points above Stage I, including at least 15 points from EARTHSCI 201, 260-262, GEOG 260-262, GEOLOGY 201
Restriction:
EARTHSCI 330
Course coordinator: 
Murray Ford

GEOG 330: Research Methods in Physical Geography
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GEOG 331: Fluvial Geomorphology


An integrated study of hydrological and fluvial processes in a river basin context. Content includes examination of the water balance, run off generating processes and river hydrology, integrated with investigation of sediment sources and transport and resulting deposits. Scientific principles are applied to selected practical problems. There is a fieldtrip associated with this course

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour and one 1-hour lecture per week, plus four 2-hour labs
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including 15 points from EARTHSCI 260-263, GEOG 201, GEOG 260-263, or equivalent
Course coordinator:  Jon Tunnicliffe

 

GEOG 331: Fluvial Geomorphology
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GEOG 332: Climate and Environment


An exploration of the nature of atmospheric processes that affect our climatic environment, at a range of temporal and spatial scales, with a focus on applications and contemporary issues. The course is divided into sections in which lectures are provided by staff with research expertise and interest in the topics covered. Themes covered in the course include selected topics in applied climatology, urban climates, boundary layer processes and bioclimatology.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour lecture per week, plus one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including 15 points from EARTHSCI 260-263, GEOG 201, GEOG 260-263, or equivalent
Course coordinator: 
Jennifer Salmond

GEOG 332: Climate and Environment
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GEOG 334: Environmental Change


An exploration of the nature and causes of change in selected aspects of the physical environment. Key themes are: a) natural processes driving environmental change and variability; b) humans as agents of change, and; c) biophysical and societal sensitivity to change. Course content will include past, present, and future interactions between society and environmental change, with examples primarily drawn from climatology, hydrology/water resources, and ecology.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite:
45 points at Stage II, including 15 points from EARTHSCI 260-263, GEOG 201, GEOG 260-263, or equivalent
Course coordinator:  Anthony Fowler

GEOG 334: Environmental Change
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GEOG 351: Coastal and Marine Studies


This course focuses on the development of coastal landforms across a range of temporal and spatial scales. It introduces natural processes such as waves, tides and circulation, as well as geological-scale coastal evolution driven by changes in sea level and sediment supply. The course has an applied focus with specific emphasis on coastal management problems that affect society. Issues considered include coastal erosion during storms, the impacts of shoreline engineering, climate change and accelerating sea level rise.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week; plus a compulsory field trip will be held on two days at the end of week 2 or 3 (depending on tidal conditions)
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework (two labs 20%, two tests 10% each), 60% final examination
Prerequisite: 45 points at Stage II, including 15 points from EARTHSCI 260-263, GEOG 201, GEOG 260-263, or equivalent
Course coordinator: 
Mark Dickson

GEOG 351: Coastal and Marine Studies
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GEOG 352: Landscape, Environment and Heritage


An examination of environmental change from a historical geography perspective. Approaches to investigating and understanding the transformation of environments are explored, and processes driving creation of different types of landscapes including heritage places are considered. The course enables students to place the modern environment within a historical context.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week; plus a one 1-day field trip
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% examination
Course coordinator: 
Gretel Boswijk

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SCIGEN 301: Engaging in a Knowledge Society


Addressing complex issues requires knowledge experts to engage with a variety of people.  Solutions will be gained from collaborations that co-produce knowledge in transdisciplinary partnerships that lead to new ways of thinking.  This course explores meaningful ways to communicate and engage with society, and questions, reinterprets, and reassesses current ways of knowing and doing

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 1-hour tutorial per week
Points: 15
Coordinator: Marie McEntee
Assessment: 50% coursework, 60% final examination
Preparation: no prerequisites

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