School of Environment


Geography stage II courses

The school offers courses in Physical Geography, Human Geography, Geographic Information Science, and Environmental Management at Stage II.

The Stage II Geography courses develop students’ capabilities to undertake advanced studies. Students should note that these courses are prerequisites for more advanced, Stage III courses and so it is important to choose courses that will allow you to progress in your preferred areas of specialisation.

Geography majors should note that GEOG 250 is compulsory, and at least one of GEOG 202, GEOG 261 or GEOG 262 is required.

Please note the information listed under Preparation in the course descriptions below. In most cases, students should complete an appropriate Stage I course first. If you have any doubt about your ability to take one of these courses please contact the coordinator.

Students with an interest in marine science are encouraged to take Marine 202: Principles of Marine Science.

GEOG 202: Cities, Regions and Communities


A critical examination of geographic processes and consequences in contemporary society. Topics are selected from the instructors’ research interests, which include: the transformation of urban places and spaces; the forms and location of industries and retailing; social geographies of the city; New Zealand’s linkages with the global economy and society; urban historical geographies; and demographic and social changes in New Zealand and the Pacific region.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week, plus a one 2-hour laboratory in specific weeks
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final examination
Preparation: no formal prerequisites but a knowledge equivalent to GEOG 102 is assumed
Course coordinator: 
To be confirmed

GEOG 202: Cities, Regions and Communities
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GEOG 205: Environment and Society


A critical exploration of the interconnectedness of environment and society. The course highlights the importance of understanding how different views and attitudes influence people’s interactions with the environment. Key themes include governance, management and development, which are addressed through issues such as conservation, climate change adaptation, disasters and resource use. Classes draw on a variety of case studies from NZ and overseas.

This course is taught in: Summer School, City Campus (SS C); Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format SS: three 2-hour lectures per week and a 2-hour tutorial
Format S2: two 1-hour lectures per week, plus 1-hour tutorials
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Course coordinator: (Summer School) To be confirmed
Course coordinator: (Semester 2) To be confirmed

GEOG 205: Environment and Society
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GEOG 207: Field Studies in Environment and Community*


Connections between environment and community in New Zealand are explored on the ground through consideration of topics from among the following themes: biodiversity and vegetation change; land transformation; heritage values; environmental management; Maori resource management; coastal and fluvial geomorphology; regional economics; community development and planning; tourism development and government policy. The course involves a one week field trip. Course limited to 60 students.

Please note: This course may not be offered in 2019.

GEOG 207: Field Studies in Environment and Community*
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GEOG 250: Geographical Research in Practice


A critical exploration of the research experience in geography. Case studies and field work demonstrate approaches to understanding the complex interactions of social and environmental processes. Students will develop practical skills in problem identification, research methodologies, ethics and analytical practices.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour lecture per week, plus one 2-hour lab per week; and a 1-day field trip on either Friday 7 or Saturday 8 April, 2017
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Preparation: No prerequisites
Course coordinator: 
Joe Fagan

GEOG 250: Geographical Research in Practice
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GEOG 261: Climate, Hydrology and Biogeography


An exploration of themes in climatology, hydrology, and biogeography with a focus on the nature and role of key environmental and biological processes at various spatial and temporal scales. The role of climate as a fundamental driver of hydrological and biogeographical processes is an important theme and New Zealand native forest is a focus.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% final examination
Prerequisite: GEOG 101
Restriction:
EARTHSCI 261, GEOG 201
Course coordinator: 
Anthony Fowler

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GEOG 262: Geomorphology


Introduces fundamental concepts in geomorphology for geologists and physical geographers. Key aspects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and earth surface processes are introduced by studying the temporal and spatial development of coastal and river landforms. Applied techniques for earth and environmental sciences, including field, remote sensing, GIS mapping, and modelling.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite: GEOG 101
Restriction:
EARTHSCI 262, GEOG 201
Course coordinator:  
Mark Dickson 

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For more information