School of Environment


Geography stage I courses

Four Stage I courses are offered in the Geography programme, plus EARTHSCI 105 which will be of interest to geographers, too.

GEOG 101 and GEOG 102 are the introductory Physical and Human Geography courses, respectively. These are the core courses for students intending to major in Geography. At least one of these two courses is required for the Geography Major, but it is recommend that both are taken in order to maximise your choices at more advanced levels. These courses are offered in first and second semester to allow some flexibility in designing your course of study. Anyone who has no previous experience of Geography will find these courses appropriate. However, they are also recommended to those who have studied Geography at Year 13, as they will introduce new topics and techniques.

Please note: The letter 'G' in the course number indicates that this course is also offered as a general education course.

GEOG 101: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms


A fundamental understanding of the functioning of natural systems at the Earth’s surface and the complexities of human interactions with these systems. The course examines the operation and interaction between the Atmospheric, Hydrological, Ecological and Geomorphic systems. Environmental processes are used as an integrating theme. Specific topics covered include: the climate and hydrological systems, ecological processes; the surface sediment cycle; and processes governing development and dynamics of major landform types. The course also highlights the relevance of Earth surface processes to resolving applied environmental problems.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C); Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week and one 2-hour laboratory fortnightly
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework (labs 30%, test 20%), 50% final examination
Course coordinator: 
Joseph Fagan

GEOG 101: Earth Surface Processes and Landforms
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GEOG 102: Geography of the Human Environment


This course examines the relationships among personal geographies and global geographies of uneven development, economic and socio-cultural change. Using a variety of examples from New Zealand and the world we illustrate the connections between local places and global issues.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C); Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week plus one 2-hour tutorial fortnightly
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Course coordinator: 
Melanie Wall

 

GEOG 102: Geography of the Human Environment
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GEOG 103/103G: Mapping Our World


Please note: This course may no tbe offered in 2017.

An introduction to contemporary geospatial technologies such as web-mapping, GPS and tracking devices (such as your phone), and GIS.  Covers key concepts and principles behind these tools and their use, along with practical experiences through laboratories. Critical and theoretical perspectives on the tools, their use, and their social impacts will be discussed.

This course is taught in: Summer School, City Campus (SS C)

Format: three 2-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Course coordinator:   tba

GEOG 103/103G: Mapping Our World
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GEOG 104/104G: Cities and Urbanism


What makes a great city? This course explores ‘urbanism’ in both historical and contemporary cities to determine the essence of urbanity and the way that citizens (and visitors) experience city life. Since the majority of the world’s population live in cities the study of the city is a study of the contemporary human condition, yet city life remains distinguishable from other forms of human settlement, and while there are many cities, there are fewer ‘great cities’, and the reasons for this are not simply related to size or apparent wealth. The dynamics and character of cities are considered in terms of their built environment, economic systems, population, human and cultural diversity and planning policies and practices.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination

Course coordinator:  Melanie Wall



GEOG 104/104G: Cities and Urbanism
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EARTHSCI 105/105G: Natural Hazards in New Zealand


New Zealanders are exposed to extreme natural events and processes including earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, weather bombs, storm surge, tsunami, flooding, landslides and erosion. The physical context for each hazard is provided, drawing on the disciplines of geology, geomorphology and climatology. The frequency and magnitude of natural hazards for New Zealand are considered using different sources. Impacts on modern society are discussed using case studies and scenario modelling.

Note: This course was formerly offered as GEOG 105/105G.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: two 1-hour lectures per week, plus five laboratories to be completed during the semester
Points:
15
Assessment:
40% coursework (labs 20%, two tests 10% each), 60% final examination
Restriction:
GEOG 105, 105G, GEOLOGY 110
Course coordinator:
Kate Kenedi

EARTHSCI 105/105G: Natural Hazards in New Zealand
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For more information