School of Environment


Earth Sciences Stage II courses

The school offers several courses in Earth Sciences at Stage II.

There are a wide range of Earth Sciences courses at Stage II. If you are studying for an Earth Sciences major then you must take at least four Stage II EARTHSCI courses, including either EARTHSCI 201 or 260.

 

EARTHSCI 202: Earth History


Explores the evolution of the Earth from its molten beginnings to the dynamic planet we live on today. Topics include: stratigraphy (litho-, bio-, cyclo-, magneto-); evolution; paleoecology; Precambrian Earth (formation, first continents and beginnings of life); development of the Earth and life through the Phanerozoic Eon. Knowledge of geological mapping equivalent to EARTHSCI 201 or 220 will be assumed.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week; plus a one day field trip
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework (labs and assignments), 40% examination
Prerequisite: 75 points, including at least 15 points from EARTHSCI 103, 120, GEOLOGY 103, 104 
Restriction: GEOLOGY 202
Course coordinator: 
Barry O'Connor

EARTHSCI 202: Evolution of Earth and Life
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EARTHSCI 203: Rocks and Minerals


The formation of rocks and minerals, and how they can be used to identify and interpret major Earth Science processes such as crustal evolution, volcanism, mountain building, and deformation. The relationship between rock formation and global-scale tectonic settings is explored.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite: 15 points from EARTHSCI 103, GEOLOGY 103
Restriction: 
GEOLOGY 203
Course coordinator:  
Philip Shane

EARTHSCI 203: Rock Genesis
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EARTHSCI 208: Earth Structure


A foundation course that introduces students to descriptive and analytical methods in structural geology. Geological maps are used to help students analyse structural features (eg, folds, faults, contacts). On completion of this course, students should be able to interpret geological maps, construct cross-sections, and synthesise analytical results into a structural history.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab per week, and a compulsory 1-day field trip scheduled for either a Saturday or Sunday (check the course outline)
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite:
15 points from EARTHSCI 103, GEOLOGY 103, 104
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 204
Course coordinator: Barry O’Connor

EARTHSCI 204: Earth Structure
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EARTHSCI 205/205G: New Zealand: Half a Billion Years on the Edge


Take a 500 million year journey through time following the geologic and biologic development of New Zealand from humble beginnings on the edge of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana to the present day geologically dynamic land mass beset by volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and massive erosion as a consequence of being located on the edge of the Earth's largest tectonic plate.

This course will be offered in first semester.

Format: two 1-hour lecture

Course coordinator: Barry O’Connor

EARTHSCI 205/205G: New Zealand: Half a Billion Years on the Edge
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EARTHSCI 220: Practice in Earth Sciences 1


A practical and field based course that introduces and develops theory and work flows to enable students to read, document and interpret landforms and landscapes in 4-D. Students will be required to participate in a residential field experience and undertake independent field work.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab per week, plus a compulsory field trip in mid semester break. Dates to be advised.
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisite: 15 points from EARTHSCI 120, GEOG 101
Restriction:
EARTHSCI 201, 260
Course coodinator:
Nicholas Richards

EARTHSCI 201: Introductory Geological Skills and Methods
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EARTHSCI 262: Geomorphology


Introduces fundamental concepts in geomorphology for geologists and physical geographers. Key aspects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and earth surface processes are introduced by studying the temporal and spatial development of coastal and river landforms. Applied techniques for earth and environmental sciences, including field, remote sensing, GIS mapping, and modelling.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite:
GEOG 101
Restriction:
GEOG 201, 262
Course coordinator:  
Mark Dickson

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