School of Environment


Earth Sciences Stage II courses

The school offers several courses in Earth Sciences at Stage II.

There are a wide range of Earth Sciences courses at Stage II. If you are studying for an Earth Sciences major then you must take at least four Stage II EARTHSCI courses, including either EARTHSCI 201 or 260.

 

EARTHSCI 201: Field Skills and Methods in Earth Sciences


Field survey techniques for earth sciences, including spatial–temporal geological and geomorphological evolution reconstruction. Includes: field surveying, terrain/geological mapping and systematic observation and recording, links between earth surface processes and geological formations, geological structures, stratigraphy, sedimentology and palaeontology. Practical classes utilise data from residential field course/ independent mapping projects.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab per week, plus three compulsory field trips - 1 day, 5-6 days, 2 days - run over weekends and teaching breaks. Dates to be advised.
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisite: 15 points from EARTHSCI 103, GEOLOGY 103,104
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 201
Course coodinator:
Barry O'Connor

 

EARTHSCI 201: Introductory Geological Skills and Methods
Top

EARTHSCI 202: Evolution of Earth and Life


Explores the evolution of the Earth from its molten beginnings to the dynamic planet we live on today. Topics include: stratigraphy (litho-, bio-, cyclo-, magneto-); evolution; paleoecology; Precambrian Earth (formation, first continents and beginnings of life); development of the Earth and life through the Phanerozoic Eon.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour laboratory per week; plus a one day field trip
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework (labs and assignments), 40% examination
Prerequisite: 15 points from GEOLOGY 103 or GEOLOGY 104
Restriction: GEOLOGY 202
Course coordinator: 
Barry O'Connor

EARTHSCI 202: Evolution of Earth and Life
Top

EARTHSCI 203: Rock Genesis


An examination of the origin and evolution of igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks by focussing on formative processes in the Earth's interior and surface. Material covered includes: controls on the mineralogy and chemistry of magmas; sedimentary processes and controls; biogenic sediments; and metamorphic facies. Silicate and carbonate minerals will be introduced and used to develop petrographic microscopy skills. The course includes fieldwork.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C).

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour lab per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite: 15 points from EARTHSCI 103, GEOLOGY 103
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 203
Course coordinator: 
Philip Shane

EARTHSCI 203: Rock Genesis
Top

EARTHSCI 204: Earth Structure


A foundation course in structural geology introduces students to descriptive and analytical methods for working with deformed rock. On completion of this course a student will be able to describe brittle and ductile structures, undertake simple analyses of stress and strain, and appreciate the role that structural geology plays in the applied and fundamental geological sciences, including engineering geology, geophysics, mineral and energy exploration, hydrogeology, and tectonophysics. Students enrolling in this course are encouraged to complement it with courses in any of mathematics, physics and/or geomechanics.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: two 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab per week, and a compulsory 1-day field trip scheduled for either a Saturday or Sunday (check the course website)
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite:
15 points from EARTHSCI 103, GEOLOGY 103, 104
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 204
Course coordinator:   Julie Rowland

 

EARTHSCI 204: Earth Structure
Top

EARTHSCI 205/205G: New Zealand: Half a Billion Years on the Edge


Take a 500 million year journey through time following the geologic and biologic development of New Zealand from humble beginnings on the edge of the ancient supercontinent Gondwana to the present day geologically dynamic land mass beset by volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and massive erosion as a consequence of being located on the edge of the Earth's largest tectonic plate.

This course is taught in: First semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: two 1-hour lectures per week, plus a one day field trip
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisite: 75 Points passed
Restriction: GEOLOGY 205, 205G
Course coordinator: 
Barry O'Connor

 

EARTHSCI 205/205G: New Zealand: Half a Billion Years on the Edge
Top

EARTHSCI 210: Introduction to GIS and Spatial Thinking


A critical exploration of the research experience in geography. Case studies and field work demonstrate approaches to understanding the complex interactions of social and environmental processes. Students will develop practical skills in problem identification, research methodologies, ethics and analytical practices.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture and one 1-hour lecture per week, plus one 2-hour lab per week; and a 1-day field trip on either Friday 7 or Saturday 8 April, 2017
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Preparation: No prerequisites
Course coordinator: 
Murray Ford

 

Top

EARTHSCI 260: Field Studies in Earth Surface Processes


Introduction to laboratory, field methods and analytical techniques to interpret the dynamics of Earth surface processes. Specific topics include: geomorphic mapping; landform observation and topographic survey; soil and sedimentary analyses and sampling; stratigraphic analysis; measurement of climatic, hydrological and coastal processes; and techniques for ecological measurement and monitoring.

Format: one 2-hour lecture and one 3-hour laboratory per week, plus compulsory field trip: Sunday 10th September to Saturday 16th September
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisite: GEOG 101
Restriction: GEOG 201, 260
Course coordinator:
Nicholas Richards

Top

EARTHSCI 261: Climate, Hydrology and Biogeography


Exploration of themes in climatology, hydrology, and biogeography with a focus on the nature and role of key processes at various spatial and temporal scales in the biosphere. The role of climate as a fundamental driver of hydrological and biogeographical processes is an important theme.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite:
GEOG 101
Restriction:
GEOG 201, 261
Course coordinator: 
Anthony Fowler

Top

EARTHSCI 262: Geomorphology


Introduces fundamental concepts in geomorphology for geologists and physical geographers. Key aspects of geomorphology, sedimentology, and earth surface processes are introduced by studying the temporal and spatial development of coastal and river landforms. Applied techniques for earth and environmental sciences, including field, remote sensing, GIS mapping, and modelling.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour laboratory per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisite:
GEOG 101
Restriction:
GEOG 201, 262
Course coordinator:  
Mark Dickson

Top

EARTHSCI 263: Tools and Techniques for the Earth Sciences


Exploring and understanding the complexities of Earth systems requires Earth Scientists to engage with a range of quantitative techniques and tools.  Students will be introduced to contemporary approaches for analysing and interpreting Earth Science data, including mathematical, physical, computational and chemical methods.  The course emphasises the practical application of these to a variety of Earth Science topics.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Preparation: STATS 101 or 108, or equivalent
Course coordinator:
Ingo Pecher  

For more information