School of Environment


Geography courses

All students who are intending to enrol in the Geography Postgraduate Programme are encouraged to consult the Geography Postgraduate Adviser over their selection of courses:

Entry to Geography postgraduate courses by students outside the School of Environment

Other than GEOG 701, all Geography postgraduate courses are available for entry by students not in the Geography postgraduate programme. They may be taken for credit in another degree but they cannot be cross credited towards a postgraduate degree in Geography.

Permission to enrol is required from both the Geography Postgraduate Adviser (to check general prerequisites) and, most importantly, from the individual course coordinator. While applications from outside students are generally welcomed, because of content or restrictions on numbers, some courses, may not be able to accommodate any extra students. In addition it should be noted that in the guidance to selection of courses, certain Geography courses are listed as expected or useful. While these give some indication of linked courses, they should be regarded as equivalent to prerequisites or corequisites. The important point is that you should discuss your possible acceptance into the course with the listed course coordinator.

 

Postgraduate Thesis and Dissertations

GEOG 789: Honours Dissertation 30 points

GEOG 796: Masters Thesis | A&B | 30 points:
students must enrol in A & B

 

Timetable information

Please be aware timetable information provided below is for general guidance and times are subject to change. While we endeavour to keep this as up to date as possible, students should NOT base their enrolment on the timetable information provided below. All students must check on SSO (Student Services Online) as this contains the latest and most accurate timetable information.

Visit Student Services Online

GEOG 701: Research in Practice


A reflection on the process of developing research projects from theory to methods, analysis, and the presentation of findings. Attention is directed to the ways in which research is shaped by intellectual histories, pressing social and environmental challenges, and contemporary academic and political debates. The course allows students to develop specialised interests in geography or environmental management.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week followed by a 1-hour tutorial
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Programme:
this course is compulsory for the Geography and Environmental Management postgraduate programmes
Programme coordinator:  
Gary Brierley, Hong-Key Yoon, JC Gaillard, Mark Dickson, Nick Lewis, Robin Kearns and Tom Baker

GEOG 701: Research in Practice
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GEOG 711: Emerging Economic Spaces*


Examines globalising economic and institutional processes, localising forces and practices of economic and institutional actors in the creation and scaling of new spatial arrangements, connections and networks. In 2012 the course emphasises agglomeration, city and region innovation ecologies, scaling up strategies and building economic development leadership capabilities. The course is closely aligned to the Schools ‘Globalising Processes’ and ‘Urban Dynamics’ research themes.

*This course is not offered in 2017.

GEOG 711: Emerging Economic Spaces*
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GEOG 712: Land, Place and Culture


Contemporary geographic perspectives on society and culture, focusing on a review of traditional and new cultural geographic approaches to the constructions of place and environment, ethnicity, gender and identity.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisite, but an understanding of material in Stage III courses in human geography will be assumed
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Programme coordinator:  
Hong-Key Yoon and Robin Kearns

 

GEOG 712: Land, Place and Culture
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GEOG 714: Population, Mobilities and Wellbeing


An exploration of the changing nature of human populations, the dynamics of human mobilities, the determinants of health status and evolving modes of healthcare provision.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
no formal prerequisite, but an understanding of material in Stage III courses in human geography will be assumed
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Programme coordinator:  
Francis Collins and Robin Kearns

 

GEOG 714: Population, Mobilities and Wellbeing
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GEOG 715: Development and New Regional Geographies


'Development' is place-dependent and takes place at a range of scales. This course considers economic, socio-cultural, geopolitical and environmental transformations of nations, regions, communities, and emerging or post-foundational political spaces focussing on examples from Pacific, Asia and New Zealand.


This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Preparation: no formal prerequisite, but an understanding of material in Stage III courses in human geography will be assumed
Course coordinator:
Ward Friesen

 

 

GEOG 715: Development and New Regional Geographies*
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GEOG 717: Contemporary Issues in Human Geography*


A critical review of selected issues and debates in contemporary human geography.


*This course will not be offered in 2017.

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GEOG 718: Urban Worlds*


An exploration of contemporary debates in urban theory and research. This course critically examines contemporary processes of urbanization and imaginings of city futures. Particular emphasis is placed on interrogating questions about urbanisation through a comparative lens, exploring the different geographies of urban life and politics that emerge in cities across the planet.

*This course will not be offered in 2017.

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GEOG 719: Geographies of Housing and Urban Change


Advanced study of housing and urban issues, including the topics of homeownership, asset-based welfare, the politics of housing affordability, housing reforms and the changing dynamics of gentrification. Contemporary issues such as mortgage market dynamics and social rented housing reforms are examined. The course will consider also urban governance, office property investment and development processes, and sites of consumption and spectacle.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per weekPoints: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework and 60% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Course coordinator: 
Laurence Murphy

GEOG 725: People, Participation and Development


A critical overview of issues associated with people’s participation in development in their geographical context, including processes and outcomes, accountability, empowerment and transformation in the context of livelihood strengthening, resource management, health and sanitation, education and disaster risk reduction. The course provides the students with theoretical knowledge but also practical skills through the use in class of participatory tools as both contents and teaching aids. Discussions rely upon concrete examples from throughout the world with a particular focus on marginalised places.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Course coordinator:
JC Gaillard

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GEOG 730: Climate Change: Past, Present and Future


An exploration of the character and causes of past, present, and future climate change. Content includes examination of how and where climate is (or is not) currently changing, and uncertainties associated with future projections. The temporal focus will be on the Holocene and the Anthropocene, through to the end of the 21st century. A human society context will feature throughout.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S1 C)


Format: one 2-hour class per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework and 50% examination
Prerequisite: none
Course coordinator: Anthony Fowler  

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GEOG 738: Future Food and Biological Economies*


Investigates contemporary understandings, issues and strategies relating to the development of biological economies and food networks in the context of the globalising food economy. Addresses transformations in agro-food complexes and questions of nature-society relationships to do with 'sustainable' and 'resilient' food production and consumption.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography programme and an approved course for the Environmental Management programme

*This course will not be offered in 2017.

GEOG 738: Future Food and Biological Economies
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GEOG 745: Applied Fluvial Geomorphology


Catchment-scale perspectives are used to analyse spatial and temporal variability in river forms and processes. River responses to human disturbance are placed in a longer-term evolutionary context. Prospective 'river futures' are appraised, linking principles from geomorphology and hydrology to provide a physical platform with which to frame management applications (especially river rehabilitation options).

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture each week for the first five weeks followed by a field trip (7-10 April inclusive)
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisites: No formal prerequisite but final year undergraduate experience in a related field required
Programme: This is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Course coordinator:  Jon Tunnicliffe

GEOG 745: Applied Fluvial Geomorphology
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GEOG 746: Applied Coastal Geomorphology


This is an advanced course on the process-form relationships that shape coastlines over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Coastal processes are examined with field experiments in which principles of experiment design and field deployment are demonstrated. Long-term evolutionary perspectives are examined using a range of field techniques. These short- and long-term approaches are then merged to address examples of applied coastal management problems.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture each week for the first five weeks followed by a field trip in the mid-semester break and 2-hour laboratories in weeks 7-11
Points: 15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 351 is assumed
Programme:
This is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences, Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Course coordinator: 
Mark Dickson and Murray Ford
 

GEOG 746: Applied Coastal Geomorphology
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GEOG 748: Current Issues in Coastal Management


Critical consideration of contemporary issues in coastal management. Topics may include: competition for coastal space and resources; vulnerability of coastal communities to climatic variability; scientific uncertainty in the decision making process; understanding the legacies of past planning decisions. Case studies are used to explore complexities of the physical and social dimensions of coastal management approaches within the context of current regulatory frameworks.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography programme and an approved course for the Environmental Management programme
Course coordinator: Murray Ford, Paul Kench and Susan Owen

 

GEOG 748: Current Issues in Coastal Management
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GEOG 749: Climate and Society*


An examination of inter-relationships between climate and society. The sensitivity of selected biophysical and human activity systems to climate will be investigated and the actual and potential impacts of climatic variability and change investigated. Impact themes will vary from year to year, but are likely to be drawn from hydrology and water resources, agriculture, human health, ecosystems, and energy.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week or equivalent
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 332 is assumed
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography programme and an approved course for the Environmental Management programme

*This course will not be offered in 2017.

GEOG 749: Climate and Society
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GEOG 771: Spatial Analysis and Geocomputation


Approaches and challenges to analysing spatial data. Specific techniques covered will include measures of spatial autocorrelation, geographical regression, point pattern analysis, interpolation, overlay analysis, and an introduction to some of the newer geocomputation methods such as neural networks and cellular automata.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 318 will be assumed
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Geography, Earth Sciences and Environmental Science programmes
Course coordinator: 
Jay Gao

 

GEOG 771: Spatial Analysis and Geocomputation
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GEOG 772: Advanced Raster Data Analysis


Concepts and theories underpinning digital analysis of raster data, including remotely sensed data, LiDAR data and digital elevation models. Sources, nature and accuracy of raster data, analysis and integration of raster data from diverse sources, and applications of raster data analysis in hydrology and environmental modelling.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week, plus one hour labs
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 317 is assumed
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography and Earth Sciences programmes
Course coordinator: Jay Gao

 

GEOG 772: Advanced Raster Data Analysis
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GEOG 773: Visualization and Cartography*


Introduction to field of cartography, drawing contrasts with new approaches to geovisualisation facilitated by information visualisation and statistical graphics. Human perceptual and cognitive systems as related to visual displays. Principles of sound perceptual and cognitive map design. Planning, creation and delivery of cartographic and visualization-based projects. Review of emerging and future trends in this fast-changing field.

*This course will not be offered in 2016.

 

GEOG 773: Visualization and Cartography*
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GEOG 779: Programming, GIS Customisation and Web-mapping*


Spatial databases, spatial data structures and algorithms and converting and handling spatial data. Introduction to programming (in Python). Principles of object- and component-oriented architectures including details relating to ArcGIS as an example. Open source and open standards, web-mapping as a case-study.

*This course will not be offered in 2017.

 

GEOG 779: Programming, GIS Customisation and Web-mapping*
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EARTHSCI 705: Geohazards


Contemporary methods used to identify and assess natural hazards, techniques used for the probabilistic forecasting, spatial representation and communication of hazards. How the relationship between hazard information, risk mitigation and emergency management is addressed. There will be a strong focus on the use of case studies.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week, plus a 2-day field course during the mid-semester break and a 4-hour workshop in week 8
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 705
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences, Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator: 
Daneil Hikuroa, JC Gaillard and Jan Lindsay

 

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EARTHSCI 713: Tectonic Geomorphology


New Zealand is an ideal location in which to investigate the interplay between tectonics and geomorphic processes. This will be demonstrated by combining relevant case studies and field practice whereby students will develop skills in report writing and handling of some of the data, literature and tools necessary to conduct field research in active tectonics and landform generation.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: One 2-hour class each week, plus a 4-day field course (dates to be confirmed)
Points: 15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOG 743, GEOLOGY 713, 773
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator:  tba

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EARTHSCI 732: Reconstructing Environmental Change


Examines key issues in environmental change with an emphasis on the South West Pacific during the Quaternary. Methods applied to reconstruct and constrain the timing of environmental change are explored, including glacial geomorphology, environmental isotopes, micro- and macro-fossil remains such as pollen, diatoms and wood, and relevant geochronologic techniques.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour class each week, plus a 4-day field course, Thursday 19 – Sunday 22 May
Points: 15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOG 732
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geography programmes
Programme Coordinator:
Gretel Boswijk and Paul Augustinus

 

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ENVMGT 741: Social Change for Sustainability


Explores the concept of sustainability through different theoretical frameworks and how social and environmental movements have mobilized around this concept over time. Critically interrogates what is sustainable, what is social change, and how can social change be sustainable in a global economy. Draws on case studies of current environmental issues and associated popular social movements.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Environmental Management and Geography programmes
Requirement: All students enrolled in this course must attend the first class.
Programme coordinator: 
Ann Bartos

ENVMGT 741: Social Change for Sustainability
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ENVMGT 742: Social Dimensions of Global Environmental Change


An examination of the social dimensions of global environmental change. This includes a review of the history of climate science, the interaction of science with other knowledges, and contemporary debates surrounding climate change as well as other forms of environmental change. It also examines the different ways in which people respond to environmental risks and changes, and the challenges associated with mitigation and adaptation policies.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each
Points:
15
Assessment:
60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Environmental Management and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator:  
Meg Parsons

 

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ENVMGT 743: Environmental Policy


Debates surrounding environmental policy and governance provide insights into the complexities of environmental management issues. Examples of environmental governance will be considered from global to local scales. The roles of international agencies, nation-states, civil society and corporations in shaping environmental policy and governance are examined.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for both the Environmental Management and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator:  Susan Owen

ENVMGT 743: Environmental Policy
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ENVMGT 744: Resource Management


A review of advanced principles, concepts and approaches to the sustainable management of natural resources. Case studies emphasise the need for conflict resolution, equitable allocation, and decentralised decision-making to address the social and environmental impacts of resource utilisation.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for both the Environmental Management and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator: 
Karen Fisher

ENVMGT 744: Resource Management
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ENVMGT 746: Collaborative Environmental Management


An exploration of participatory management and its potential for engaging communities, resource users and stakeholders in the pursuit of sustainable development. Students will examine strategies for incorporating local knowledges within conservation practices and for reconciling natural resource management with human welfare, social justice and indigenous rights.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture per week and a fieldtrip 22-24 February
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for both the Environmental Management and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator: 
Brad Coombes

 

ENVMGT 746: Collaborative Environmental Management
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ENVSCI 704: Modelling of Environmental Systems


The following themes are emphasised: (i) building and using models to investigate environmental and social problems, (ii) understanding the utility of modelling in various disciplines, and (iii) appreciating how dynamic phenomena can be represented and analysed computationally. The course provides an understanding of modelling concepts, approaches and applications, and methods for determining the suitability of a particular modelling approach for a given task.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture and one 2-hour lab per week
Points:
15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisites: no formal requirement, but knowledge equivalent to that covered in courses such as STATS 101, MATH 108, GEOG 250, BIOSCI 209, ENVSCI 310 will be assumed
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator:  Giovanni Coco

ENVSCI 704: Modelling of Environmental and Social Systems
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ENVSCI 713: Air Quality and Atmospheric Processes


Monitoring, modelling and management will be considered with emphasis on air quality standards and guidelines and applications of science and technology to indoor and outdoor air pollution prevention, mitigation and remediation. Case studies and practical work will link the theoretical and practical aspects of air quality science.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C).

Format: taught as six 4-hour sessions in weeks 1-6
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final examination or test
Prerequisites: none
Programme: this is one of the core options for both the Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Programme coordinator:  Jennifer Salmond

 

ENVSCI 713: Air Quality and Atmospheric Processes
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ENVSCI 737: Applied Terrestrial Ecology


The dynamics of change in terrestrial ecosystems with a focus on forest and wetland environments. The effects of factors such as climate change and fire in New Zealand’s terrestrial ecosystems will be considered. Students will be introduced to modern methods for vegetation assessment and monitoring, including multivariate statistical methods. Students are required to participate in a residential field course as this is a major component of ENVSCI 737.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: Taught as a 6-day field trip (9-14 April), plus two half-day session: 5 April pre-field trip, and 9 May post-field trip.
Points:
15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisites but assumes knowledge of ecology equivalent to BIOSCI 394 or BIOSCI 396 and data analysis equivalent to GEOG 250 or BIOSCI 209
Programme: this is one of the core options for both the Environmental Science and Geography programmes, and an approved course for the Environmental Management programme
Programme coordinator:  George Perry and Luitgard Schwendenmann

 

ENVSCI 737: Applied Terrestrial Ecology
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ENVSCI 738: Water and Society


The effects of modern lifestyles on water resources are explored to develop ideas for sustainable infrastructure in future settlements. The importance of human behaviour in water system function is examined, along with the mechanisms used to influence those behaviours.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 3-hour class per week, plus a half-day field trip on 11 March
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
None
Programme:
This is one of the core options for both the Environmental Science and Geography programmes, and an approved course for the Environmental Management programme
Programme coordinator:  
Sam Trowsdale

ENVSCI 738: Water and Society
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