School of Environment


Earth Sciences courses

EARTHSCI 703: Hydrothermal Systems: Geothermal Energy and Ore Deposits


Active hydrothermal systems are dynamic and of vital significance to national energy requirements. In addition, their fossil equivalents are often important sites for ore deposition. This course overviews the geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical features of hydrothermal systems with an emphasis on exploration and development of active systems for geothermal energy, and fossil systems for mineral resources.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: this course runs as a field course during the mid-semester break
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 703
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator: 
Kathleen Campbell

 

Top

EARTHSCI 705: Geohazards


Contemporary methods used to identify and assess natural hazards, techniques used for the probabilistic forecasting, spatial representation and communication of hazards. How the relationship between hazard information, risk mitigation and emergency management is addressed. There will be a strong focus on the use of case studies.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week, plus a 2-day field course during the mid-semester break and a 4-hour workshop in week 8
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 705
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences, Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Course coordinator: 
Jan Lindsay

 

Top

EARTHSCI 707: Special Topics in Earth Sciences


A series of half-course modules from which students must study at least two. Topics that will be generally offered include, but are not restricted to, Ore Deposit Geology, Advanced Mineralogy, Analytical Geochemistry, Igneous Petrology and Geochemistry, and Palaeontology: Origins and Evolution of Life.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator:  tba

 

EARTHSCI 713: Tectonic Geomorphology


New Zealand is an ideal location in which to investigate the interplay between tectonics and geomorphic processes. This will be demonstrated by combining relevant case studies and field practice whereby students will develop skills in report writing and handling of some of the data, literature and tools necessary to conduct field research in active tectonics and landform generation.

Format: One 2-hour class each week, plus a 4-day field course (dates to be confirmed)
Points: 15
Assessment: 40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites: none
Restriction: GEOG 743, GEOLOGY 713, 773
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geography programmes

*This course is not offered in 2018.

Top

EARTHSCI 714: Earthquake Geology


Understanding why, how and where earthquakes occur from identification of their source parameters to consideration of their effects (ground shaking, fault rupture and crustal stress changes). Topics include seismic style, earthquake size and source parameters, recurrence interval, conditions for failure, and earthquakes as agents for crustal fluid redistribution.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour class each week, plus a 4-day field course, Friday 1 – Monday 4 April
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 712, 714
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator:
Jennifer Eccles

Top

EARTHSCI 720: Geochemistry of our World


Provides a broad overview of applications of geochemistry across multiple disciplines. In addition, this course will help determine the suitability of different analytical techniques to different problems while providing practical experience in collecting and evaluating geochemical data. Subject areas are wide-reaching and include, geology, environmental science, biology, archaeology, and forensic sciences. Prerequisite: No formal prerequisites but knowledge of introductory chemistry will be assumed.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture and one 2-hour laboratory each week
Points: 15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 720
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Environmental Science programmes
Course coordinator: 
Michael Rowe

Top

EARTHSCI 732: Reconstructing Environmental Change


Examines key issues in environmental change with an emphasis on the South West Pacific during the Quaternary. Methods applied to reconstruct and constrain the timing of environmental change are explored, including glacial geomorphology, environmental isotopes, micro- and macro-fossil remains such as pollen, diatoms and wood, and relevant geochronologic techniques.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour class each week, plus a 4-day field course, Thursday 19 – Sunday 22 May
Points: 15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOG 732
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geography programmes
Course Coordinator:
Paul Augustinus

 

Top

EARTHSCI 752: Understanding Volcanic Systems


Understanding how and why volcanoes erupt from magma processes in mantle to eruption at the surface. All tectonic settings and explosive and effusive processes are examined. Volcanic hazards and resource exploration in volcanic terrain is also covered.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
none
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 752
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course Coordinator: 
Philip Shane

 

Top

EARTHSCI 754: Pure and Applied Sedimentology


An integrated account of aspects of advanced sedimentology from sediment source to sink. Critical examination of recent and ongoing, pure and applied research into the dynamics of sedimentary environments and their recognition in the ancient record.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: One hour class each week, plus two half-day fieldtrips in the weekend of 17-18 September
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite, but knowledge of sedimentology and sedimentary processes at the level covered in EARTHSCI 202 or 262 will be assumed
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 754
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course Coordinator: 
Lorna Strachan
 

Top

EARTHSCI 770: Engineering Geological Mapping


A field-based course which provides hands-on experience in outcrop mapping, geomorphic mapping, and simple field testing of rocks and soils for geotechnical purposes.

This course is taught in: Summer School, City Campus (SS C)

Format: This course runs from 25-29 January, 2-5 and 9-10 February and is taught as a non-residential field course
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework - entirely based on the field mapping assignments
Prerequisites:
EARTHSCI 372 or GEOLOGY 372
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 701
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator:
Nicholas Richards
 

Top

EARTHSCI 771: Advanced Engineering Geology


Advanced engineering geology focused on engineering practice. Interpretation of in-situ testing and laboratory test data (including groundwater) for the derivation of design parameters for input into numerical modeling software. The topics covered include, but are not limited to, design and analysis of site investigation, advanced core logging, slope stability analysis, rock fall assessment, introduction to numerical modeling, liquefaction and seismic hazard assessment for engineering design.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour class plus a 2-hour laboratory each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
50% coursework, 50% final examination
Prerequisites:
EARTHSCI 372, GEOLOGY 372 or equivalent
Restriction:
GEOLOGY 771
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator: 
Martin Brook 

Top

EARTHSCI 772: Hydrogeology*


 

Examination of groundwater processes, use and management.

*This course is not offered in 2018.

 

Top

EARTHSCI 780: Advanced Field Earth Sciences


An advanced field-based course in geological and earth surface processes. This will be held at a field station in New Zealand. Students will be exposed to terrains and techniques that build on their undergraduate field studies. Students will undertake semi-independent fieldwork such as terrain and geologic mapping, and reconstruct a 500 million history of New Zealand.

This course is taught in: Summer School, City Campus (SS C)

Format: One week residential field course
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite, but an understanding equivalent to EARTHSCI 301 or 330 will be assumed
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences programme
Course coordinator: Joel Baker

EARTHSCI 789: BSc(Hons) Dissertation in Earth Sciences


This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

To complete this course, students must enrol in EARTHSCI 789 A and B, or EARTHSCI 789.

Points: 30

Top

EARTHSCI 789A: BSc(Hons) Dissertation in Earth Sciences


This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

To complete this course, students must enrol in EARTHSCI 789 A and B, or EARTHSCI 789.

Points: 15

Top

EARTHSCI 789B: BSc(Hons) Dissertation in Earth Sciences


This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

To complete this course, students must enrol in EARTHSCI 789 A and B, or EARTHSCI 789.

Points: 15

Top

GEOG 730: Climate Change: Past, Present and Future


An exploration of the character and causes of past, present, and future climate change. Content includes examination of how and where climate is (or is not) currently changing, and uncertainties associated with future projections. The temporal focus will be on the Holocene and the Anthropocene, through to the end of the 21st century. A human society context will feature throughout.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S1 C)


Format: one 2-hour class per week
Points: 15
Assessment: 50% coursework and 50% examination
Prerequisite: none
Course coordinator: Anthony Fowler  

Top

GEOG 745: Applied Fluvial Geomorphology


Catchment-scale perspectives are used to analyse spatial and temporal variability in river forms and processes. River responses to human disturbance are placed in a longer-term evolutionary context. Prospective 'river futures' are appraised, linking principles from geomorphology and hydrology to provide a physical platform with which to frame management applications (especially river rehabilitation options).

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture each week for the first five weeks followed by a field trip (7-10 April inclusive)
Points: 15
Assessment: 100% coursework
Prerequisites: No formal prerequisite but final year undergraduate experience in a related field required
Programme: This is one of the core options for the Geography programme
Course coordinator:  Gary Brierley

GEOG 745: Applied Fluvial Geomorphology
Top

GEOG 746: Applied Coastal Geomorphology


This is an advanced course on the process-form relationships that shape coastlines over a range of spatial and temporal scales. Coastal processes are examined with field experiments in which principles of experiment design and field deployment are demonstrated. Long-term evolutionary perspectives are examined using a range of field techniques. These short- and long-term approaches are then merged to address examples of applied coastal management problems.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: One 2-hour lecture each week for the first five weeks followed by a field trip in the mid-semester break and 2-hour laboratories in weeks 7-11
Points: 15
Assessment:
40% coursework, 60% final examination
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 351 is assumed
Programme:
This is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences, Environmental Science and Geography programmes
Course coordinator: 
Murray Ford
 

GEOG 746: Applied Coastal Geomorphology
Top

GEOG 771: Spatial Analysis and Geocomputation


Approaches and challenges to analysing spatial data. Specific techniques covered will include measures of spatial autocorrelation, geographical regression, point pattern analysis, interpolation, overlay analysis, and an introduction to some of the newer geocomputation methods such as neural networks and cellular automata.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites:
No formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 318 will be assumed
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Geography, Earth Sciences and Environmental Science programmes
Course coordinator: 
Jay Gao

 

GEOG 771: Spatial Analysis and Geocomputation
Top

GEOG 772: Advanced Raster Data Analysis


Concepts and theories underpinning digital analysis of raster data, including remotely sensed data, LiDAR data and digital elevation models. Sources, nature and accuracy of raster data, analysis and integration of raster data from diverse sources, and applications of raster data analysis in hydrology and environmental modelling.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour lecture per week, plus one hour labs
Points: 15
Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% final examination
Prerequisites: no formal prerequisite but an understanding equivalent to GEOG 317 is assumed
Programme: this is one of the core options for the Geography and Earth Sciences programmes
Course coordinator: Jay Gao

 

GEOG 772: Advanced Raster Data Analysis
Top

GEOPHYS 760: Seismic Data Analysis for Basin Exploration


Project-based course in which the students analyse surface seismic data to develop a geologic model with professional software. Students perform a step-by-step seismic processing flow, followed by a 3D seismic volume interpretation to develop a conceptual basin model. Two laboratory hours per week are scheduled contact hours, but students will conduct the bulk of the project at their own pace.

This course is taught in: First Semester, City Campus (S1 C)

Format: one 2-hour class each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
EARTHSCI 361 or GEOLOGY 361 or GEOPHYS 361 or equivalent
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geophysics programmes
Course coordinator:
Ludmila Adam

 

Top

GEOPHYS 761: Subsurface Imaging with Seismic and Radar Waves


The theory and practice behind imaging the subsurface using seismic and ground-penetrating radar waves. The course consists of four modules focusing on the rock physics background of geophysical techniques, aspects of geophysical studies of reservoirs, optimisation of seismic data evaluation using inversion methods, and ground-penetrating radar surveys.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: two 2-hour classes each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
GEOPHYS 330, EARTHSCI 361 or GEOLOGY 361 or GEOPHYS 361 or equivalent
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geophysics programmes
Course coordinator: 
Ingo Pecher

 

GEOPHYS 761: Advanced Applied Geophysics 1
Top

GEOPHYS 762: Subsurface Characterization with Potential Field Methods


The theory and practice of potential field, electrical and electro-magnetic methods. Topics include: basic theory, theory of potential field methods, data acquisition, data processing and interpretation of gravity and magnetic data and of electrical data.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: one 2-hour class and a 3-hour laboratory each week
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
GEOPHYS 330, EARTHSCI 361 or GEOLOGY 361 or GEOPHYS 361 or equivalent
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geophysics programmes
Programme coordinator:  
Kasper van Wijk

 

GEOPHYS 762: Advanced Applied Geophysics 2
Top

GEOPHYS 763: Advanced Applied Geophysics 3


A selection of four of the topics in GEOPHYS 761 and 762. Either the physical principles of applied geophysical methods, or the practice of applied geophysical methods, including data acquisition, data processing, and interpretation.

This course is taught in: Second Semester, City Campus (S2 C)

Format: to be advised
Points:
15
Assessment:
100% coursework
Prerequisites:
EARTHSCI 361 or GEOLOGY 361 or Stage III Geophysics or Stage III Physics
Restriction:
GEOPHYS 761, 762
Programme:
this is one of the core options for the Earth Sciences and Geophysics programmes
Course coordinator:  
Ingo Pecher

 

GEOPHYS 763: Advanced Applied Geophysics 3
Top

For more information